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Better Organized

Sunday a week ago, I decided to try and make more time for sewing. Bought a book called "Organize Now!" by Jennifer Ford Berry, which breaks the challenge into 56 weeks. As part of Week 2, I'm striving to understand my priorities.

Lots of self-help books seem to call these your values, but for some reason, this author calls them your priorities. I like that a lot better. It was a lot easier to write them down -- it took me just a few minutes instead of months, and I felt totally sure they were authentic. 

They are: 

* Comfort
* Peace
* Flavor
* Imagine
* Flow
* Smooth
* Quiet
* Organic
* Creative
* Evolving

I don't even want to start about all the people and institutions that hate values like these. People with priorities like mine aren't prone to spend money, and they aren't good joiners or followers. 

If you accept yourself as a child of God, and you believe that there's basically nothing wrong with you, it's hard for people to sell you on their "better way." 

But self-acceptance and self-approval is a very fine place to be. I think I'll stay there for a while.

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